Social Networking Advice for the Antisocial

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Writing is a solitary endeavor, but does it have to be a lonely one? Absolutely not. In fact, it’s beneficial for writers to interact with other authors in order to exchange information, market their work, and build their readership. It literally pays for authors to be social.

While attending the weekly Business Professionals Meeting at Ivy Tech in Peru, I learned some advice on social networking that I thought applied to writers, not just business owners. And I’m going to share it with you!

Use Social Media to Connect with Authors, Editors, Agents, & Readers

Social networking doesn’t just happen in the “real world.” It happens wherever people interact. One of the most popular places people go to hangout is online. You already use Facebook and Twitter to stay connected with family and friends, so why not use these social media sites to meet other authors and new readers? There are hundreds, if not thousands, of them online. You can interact with others via private message or by replying to their posts. Sharing other people’s content is another great way to interact. Once you build a positive rapport, they will be more receptive to your marketing messages or requests for help.

Attend as Many “Real World” Events as Possible

Writers conferences, book fairs, local readings, book launches, and library events are great opportunities to network with authors and readers. Plus, they’re educational. Just keep in mind, it’s not about selling; it’s about making friends, and building a readership.

Bring Marketing Material

I always take a stack of business cards and/or bookmarks with me to events. In fact, I keep a stack of each in my car just in case I run into a new friend. That way, they have links to my social media sites and a reminder that we met. Let’s face it, no matter how cool you are, people get busy and might forget you. A bookmark is a great reminder.

Follow up

Meeting someone at a networking event or following someone online is just the first step in beginning a relationship. Take those business cards home and send an email, connect on Twitter, or send an invite for coffee or lunch. Main point: stay in touch. And be patient. I once knew a prospective reader one year before they finally bought a copy of my book. It only took 3 touches. They say a sale can take 7, so that’s pretty good.

Give a Little More than You Take

I am reminded of a really corny song from Dreamwork’s animated feature Joseph, King of Dreams. Whereas the song had nothing to do with the events in the movie, it applies greatly to networking. The most successful authors are the ones who give advice and promote others. Why? Because helping others encourages them to help you.

Give it Time

Take your time and grow your network organically. No fertilizer. Don’t be tempted to buy followers in order to reach your goal overnight. The most successful authors get to know their contacts one person at a time via small events and private chat. Remember, it’s quality over quantity.

I hope you found this advice as helpful as I did. Please feel free to share your own advice in the comments below. Have a great week!

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