Recommended Writer’s Resource: Twitter for Writer’s by Rayne Hall

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Writers need different things from Twitter than ‘normal’ people … As a writer, you’ll use Twitter to meet colleagues, connect with readers, invite reviews, carry out research, improve your writing, develop networks, gain insight, conduct market studies, build your platform, create buzz for your stories, and sell your work.

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Meet Rayne Hall – Social Media Guru

Rayne Hall has one of the best platforms any writer has on Twitter – with over 50,000 genuine, engaged followers who enjoy her tweets and buy her books. There, she shares practical advice, fun ideas, step-by-strategies for success, and so much more. So what is her secret?

In her book, Twitter for Writers, she shares some of her best strategies for building a strong platform on Twitter. This book is full of practical advice for writers from creating your profile to dealing with spammers, which makes it suitable for new and aspiring authors as well as published Indie authors.

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Suitable for new writers and published Indies

Her down-to-earth no-nonsense advice is drawn from her own experience, which–to me–makes it more credible. But what I like most is that the material is tailored to the needs of the busy writer. As a busy writer herself, Rayne Hall understands that most of us are working full-time jobs outside of writing and that we don’t have time to waste on pitfalls such as auto-retweeting.

Overall, I give this book 5 out of 5 stars, and I strongly recommend it to any author who is trying to better engage with readers on social media and see an increase in sales as a result. I’m not sure if it has worked for me yet, but I’m still applying what I’ve learned.

Check it out on amazon. And for more advice, follow her on Twitter @RayneHall.


Do you have any other titles in mind? Any recommendations? Feel free to share them in the comment section below. Eventually, I’m going to compile a list of resources to share with my followers, so the more the better. As always, thank you for stopping by!

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Writer’s Resource: “Why Does My Book Not Sell? 20 Simple Fixes” by Rayne Hall

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My advice to aspiring authors: Aim to become the best writer you can possibly be. Writing craft skills matter more than any other factor. -Author Rayne Hall

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Author Rayne Hall

Rayne Hall has published more than fifty books in several languages under several pen names with several publishers in several genres, mostly fantasy, horror and non-fiction. (Are you seeing a trend here?) She is the author of the bestselling Writer’s Craft series and editor of the Ten Tales anthologies. She is a trained publishing manager, holds a masters degree in Creative Writing, and has worked in the publishing industry for over thirty years. To put it short, she’s a woman who knows her stuff.

Many of us affiliate her with her partner-in-crime, a black rescue cat named Sulu, who she features in many of her Twitter posts. To say he’s photogenic is an understatement. He enjoys reading and hamming it up for the camera.

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The infamous Sulu Cat. Who says black cats bring bad luck? Not Rayne Hall, anyway

I’ve been following Rayne Hall on Twitter for over a year now and have always enjoyed her tweets on writer’s craft and social media and whatnot. I find her very helpful, and she’s even been kind enough to answer a few questions for me via direct message. So when she sought out readers for honest reviews, I jumped at the opportunity to get my paws on one of her books. I selected her title “Why Does My Book Not Sell? 20 Simple Fixes” from her writer’s craft series.

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Part of the Writer’s Craft series. Check them out!

To say it was helpful would be an understatement. Right after Kristen Lamb’s “Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World,” Rayne Hall’s is the most descriptive and practical advice. Split into 20 chapters, her book reviews the many blocks that hinder your book sales. They range from book cover to how you interact with your followers on Twitter.

Her down to earth no-nonsense advice is drawn from her own experience. I appreciate that she admits where she’s erred. It makes her more human and relatable. It’s refreshing taking advice from a human rather than a “social media guru” for a change.

I’d say this particular book is most suitable for published Indie writers, but I don’t see why new authors or aspiring authors could not benefit from a few precautionary tales.

Overall, I give this book 5 out of 5 stars, and I strongly recommend it to any author who is trying to better engage with readers on social media and see an increase in sales as a result. I’m not sure if it has worked for me yet, but it has prevented me from making a lot of mistakes already.

Check it out on amazon. And for more advice, follow her on Twitter @RayneHall.

Hopefully, you find this resource helpful. If you’re not sure, check it out on Amazon. Read the reviews and see for yourself if you think this book would benefit you. Personally, I’m adding it to my list of author’s resources.

Do you have any other titles in mind? Any recommendations? Feel free to share them in the comment section below. Eventually, I’m going to compile a list of resources to share with my followers, so the more the better. As always, thank you for stopping by!

The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression

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Readers just don’t want to be told how the character feels; they want to feel what the character feels. That is when the Emotion Thesaurus comes in handy.

It doesn’t matter how exciting the events in a novel, without emotion the story will not be engaging to the reader. The emotional journey is the one the reader is truly interested in. We are, by nature, emotional beings; emotion is what fuels us, connects us, and allows us to share ideas and information with others in a meaningful way. As writers, we have the difficult task of trying to capture a character’s emotions and put it onto paper in a believable way. Readers just don’t want to be told how the character feels; they want to feel what the character feels. For this to happen, the characters have to express themselves in ways that are relatable to the reader.

Typically, writers are observant and empathetic people, but what about those who are not naturally inclined? Or how does a writer relay the emotions of a character suffering from long-term depression or anxiety if they themselves have never felt such strong or long-term emotions? That is when The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression by Angela Ackerman & Becca Puglisi comes in handy.

The Emotion Thesaurus provides a list of emotions such as anger, fear, curiosity and provides a definition of each, physical signals, internal signals, mental responses, cues of acute, long-term, and suppressed emotion, as well as tips and techniques for writing nonverbal emotion.

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We are, by nature, emotional beings. As writers, we have the difficult task of trying to capture a character’s emotions and put it onto paper in a believable way.

It’s very easy to use. Say I’m writing a scene about a character experiencing guilt for example, I would look up guilt and read the definition to make sure it’s the appropriate emotion. From the list of physical cues provided, I can select the ones that fit my character best, such as, ‘averting or lowering one’s gaze’ or ‘lip biting.’ I can also select internal sensations to show how my character feels, for example, ‘upset stomach’ or ‘pain in the back of the throat.’ There are also mental responses such as ‘anxiety’ to make my character’s feelings real.

As a person who sometimes lacks sympathy for others and has a problem of telling the reader what I want to say rather than showing, this resource has been invaluable. The resource includes 75 emotion entries, each section ending with a writing tip.

The Emotion Thesaurus is available online in paperback format and for Kindle. I purchased mine for Kindle on Amazon.com.

For any writer, novice or professional, The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression is a great resource.